Posted by on Jul 9, 2014 |

Very few things are permanent in my garden.  I plant them, stare for a while (sometimes for a couple of years) before making a change.  I guess I’m something of a tentative gardener.  I need my plants to be hardy enough to sustain a move or two.  I suppose the best way to avoid this problem is to make a good plan.  Unfortunately, however, sometimes I fall in love with plants at the nursery and have to find a place for them when I get home.  Other times I second guess myself and must reverse the initial decision.  Finally, there are the times when I just realize that the plant just needs a better home.

Let me give you a few examples.  I really love what Proven Winners has done in the last few years.  You can buy a set of four to six plants to create your own beautiful containers and hanging baskets.  I bought this white set and added the Heliotrope to the centre for a bit of colour and some height. As the plants grew in, it looked ok, but not perfect, at least in my mind.

Container Garden Original

Container Garden Original

So I replaced the purple with a bit of Japanese Blood Grass that I had in another pot.  This is how that looked:

Container Gardening Take 2

Container Gardening Take 2

I think I really like the difference in height better.

Check out the side garden in my back yard the first summer after I set my hostas.  The was a fun exercise the autumn before.  Having spent so much money on landscaping, I then pillaged Ian’s and my friend Debbie’s garden for donations.

Stater Hosta Bed

Stater Hosta Bed

As I stared at my garden over the next summer, I decided that the lack of symmetry, was making me a little crazy, so I decided to move the large hosta from the front row to a position in the far right corner.  I also decided to split the Siberian Bugloss in the middle which had really begun to spread this spring.

The garden looks more balanced now.  It benefits from the symmetry, and of course the additions I have made.

Hosta Bed Makeover

Hosta Bed Makeover

There are risks.  My Siberian Bugloss looked rather limp for about six weeks after I made the move. I had split this chunk off to create a third patch.  Siberian Buglosses have become one of my perennial favourites.  It is one of the first plants to emerge in the spring and then literally explodes with tiny blue flowers reminiscent of forget me nots.  With a little prune, their variegated leaves have a metallic sheen for the rest of the summer and last long into our temperate winters.

Traumatized Siberian Bugloss

Traumatized Siberian Bugloss

I needn’t have worried.   With six weeks of gentle rehabilitation, my Siberian Bugloss had made a nice recovery.

Rehabilitated Siberian Bugloss

Rehabilitated Siberian Bugloss

There are lessons of course.  For me anything I bring into the yard will have to be hardy and bear with me as I find the ideal spot.  This may mean a couple of moves, but that is the way of the tentative gardener.